How to Take Sharp Images – Part 1

  Posted in Camera on

  by Dave Kim

 

How to Take Sharp Images – Part 1

In this three-part series, I will be offering five tips to help you take sharper images.

  1. Manually pick your focus: most SLR cameras give you the option to select your focal point. This means when you look through the camera, you will see some flashing dots or squares. Those represent your focus spots or zones. You will want to make sure the camera itself does not choose your targeted focusing spot, because it will often choose the wrong thing to focus on. The camera generally pick whichever object is closest, so if your subject is behind another object, you can easily end up with the wrong thing and focus. Look on your camera to find the setting that gives you the option to adjust the focus on your camera. Often times, there will be a joystick or dial on the back of the camera you can use to adjust the focus while looking through the viewfinder. That way, you can choose spot that is most appropriate for focus.
  2. Choose the right mode for your focus: there are different types of focus modes on most cameras. On a Nikon camera, the modes are AF-A, AF-C, and AF-S. on a Canon camera, your options are Al Servo, AI Focus, and Single one shot. You will need to figure out which one fits the subject you are photographing the best. When you use single mode, or AF-S, the camera will lock in on a single subject until your finger is released from the shutter button. Al Servo, or AF-C, is used for focusing continuously on the subject that is moving. When you push the shutter button halfway down, the camera focused continuously on the moving subject. When you push the button down completely, the focus will lock on the subject you to take the photo. In the Al Focus, or AF-A mode, the camera chooses which focus to use regardless of whether or not the subject is moving.

 Using these two tips, you would get a long way in making your images sharper. Join us in our next article we discuss other ways to help your images look sharper.